Contemporary Art Practice – Moving Image (MA)

Songkun Wan

I'm nobody.

Contact

wansongkun@gmail.com

personal website

instagram

Degree Details

School of Arts & Humanities

Songkun's practice focuses on fluidity and performativity of gender, using a gentle tone to express his trauma and the intimate relationship among people.

Whoo Am I — "hoo" means her and feminine in middle English. I made a new word "whoo", which is a combination of "who" and "hoo" and pronounces as "who". In Mandarin, "who" pronounces as "shui", which resembles the pronunciation of "water". So, "whoo", for me, represents the fluidity of my queer identity - I also have a feminine personality residing within my male body.My gender is fluid as water and flows between male and female. I question myself: Who am I? Am I he, his, hoo, shoo, she, her, they, or their? "Whoo am I?", I am whoo. I am water.

Desire arises in my queer body from time to time, whether it is me bounded in gender binary or as free as water. Desire flows to every corner of my body with gender fluidity, it is like a delicious fruit, sweet, bitter, and I long for it, and my gender identity is like water, free, shapeless, and capricious. I try to visualize my desire and materialize it into the fruit. It is a unique fruit of desire born in my queer body which is gender fluidity. It has the gender characteristics of the gender binary. I also use some props with ambiguous gender characteristics to visualize my gender identity and show how my unique gender flows between the binary gender. I use three chapters to show my exploration of my own gender identity, step by step from self-doubt to embracing my gender fluidity. This video is like my monologue diary, and I try to use poetic language and Chinese monologue to show my life experience as a queer. It shows memories, fantasies, and reality presenting my queer body's desire and physical and psychological feelings in daily life. "hoo" means her and feminine in middle English. I made a new word "whoo", which is a combination of "who" and "hoo" and pronounces as "who". In Mandarin, "who" pronounces as "shui", which resembles the pronunciation of "water". So, "whoo", for me, represents the fluidity of my queer identity - I also have a feminine personality residing within my male body. My gender is fluid as water and flows between male and female. I question myself: who am I? Am I he, his, hoo, shoo, she, her, they, or their? "Whoo am I?", I am whoo. I am water.

Medium:

video

Size:

9:22 mins
Ceramic
Film
gender fluidity
gender performativity
Moving image
non-binary
Performance
porcelain
Queer
Surrealism
Social
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