Print (MA)

EG1

G1, born in South Korea in 1993, currently works in Seoul and Cheongju, South Korea. 

She graduated with a BA in Printmaking in Hongik University in 2017, and went on to study Print at the Royal College of Art from 2018-2020.

She is a member of two feminist collectives: Thiasos, based in the UK and internationally, and Buraza , based in South Korea.

 

G1 has been obsessed with Pink since 2017, after having finished an obsession with Purple. She researches the history of pink and make works based on it. Pink, to her, is not just a colour, but a colour in relationship with society and people. Pink is a strong symbol with a distinct place in history. 

 

Recent exhibitions include “Light Pink”, Light Rainbow, Seoul (upcoming); “Against the Grain”, Southwark Park Gallery, London; “Over the Horizon 2nd” and “Lay with me”, Dyson Gallery, London; and “Over the Horizon 1st”, Courtyard Gallery, London.

Contact

jjom821@gmail.com

jiweon.lee@netwokr.rca.ac.uk

@easy_wooon

Degree Details

School of Arts & Humanities

Pink is the colour that gives us the strongest voice. 

Is pink a girl, or a boy? Some say it is definitely a girl, but does the colour have a gender? There is no other colour that has as strong symbolic meaning as pink. It is a colour that refers to one gender by its presence alone. Often when you see pink in public, it means the things or facilities are for women. This is such a deep-rooted stereotype, it is not easy to think of anything else.

I was born in South Korea, the second among three sisters. In a family of four women and a series of girls' schools, my father and some teachers were the only men in my life until I became an adult. When I first move to Seoul to study, I found that the outside world treated me as a woman rather than a human being. I had lived to that point thinking that I was the centre of my own life, but I was a woman who can't be a centre in society. I felt like I had become an outsider. 

Female, human sex, not a man. Pink, of the numerous shades of red mixed with white. Not as intense as red, not as pure as white, may in itself refer to those who have become dreary peripherals. Rather than those who have been dressed in pink since birth, I'm more interested in the meaning of pink for people who do not normally enjoy pink. Pink itself is interpreted as a woman's colour and has come to signify the feminine, but a lot of times even those who identify themselves as women avoid pink to avoid the stigma. The same societal pressure that deprives non-women of pink, forces the colour upon women, perpetuating the frustration and silence of countless people. 

I study the past and present of "pink" and observe its position in modern society. In my practice, I explore conflicts arising between people who want to accept pink and who want to escape from pink, and the society that would see pink as exclusively feminine. What is pink? What is femininity? What is it about femininity and the colour pink that some people fear? These questions were the beginning of my pink series. The pink I mean in my projects is typical femininity that is commonly seen in a ‘normal’ society. In viewing my work, I want the audience to think differently than the clichéd understanding of pink.

Courage to say Pink is my favourite 1

Courage to say Pink is my favourite 2

There is a common assumption in society that men don't like Pink. If I were to count the number of men who wear pink on the street (even young boys), I couldn’t say that it is not true. One of the reasons for men’s avoidance of pink is simple: Pink is too “girly” for them.
How has pink, just a colour, itself, come to be such a strong symbol? It is interesting that in the 1920s, specifically in Western culture, pink was a boys' colour, while blue was for girls. Why can't men love pink today?
This raises a whole host of questions. What is femininity today? Why are effeminate men seen as a problem in a patriarchal society? What is wrong with being “girly”? If femininity is not a positive word, why would women be expected to be more feminine?
As a person who loves pink, I aim to give courage to people who have never worn pink in their lives, to be able to be more feminine and embrace pink as a bold act of self-identification. Even in a society that imposes strict gender norms, I am able to identify myself as a pink lover, a skincare master, a picky cake devotee. Let's all identify ourselves as we are.

Medium:

Acrylic on fabric

Size:

145X200cm
colour
courage
fear
female
Femininity
Gender
male
Masculinity
pink
pressure
Society
stereotype

I'll never be pink again

When something is repeated, it can become boring. On the other hand, it may also exert a strong force. What a person says may seem more desperate through repetition, as if talking to themselves. Unlike Courage to say Pink is my favourite, this work rejects the colour pink and dreams of breaking off with it. The phrase 'I'll never … again' comes from a common punishment for young children to repeatedly write a phrase in order to encourage self-reflection. But what if the writer has a different experience? What if the writer has no sincere remorse? Societal norms dictate who should use pink and who is feminine or masculine. This work expresses opposition to these norms through the repetition of the paradox.

Medium:

Acrylic on fabric

Size:

145X250cm

To be Pink 1

To be Pink 2

Can femininity be like water? If people think “I’m not feminine at all”, or they project femininity far away from them, it becomes a very sticky, filthy, pink liquid that seems extremely dangerous. When they do come in contact with it, they may think it is going to change everything, from the beginning to the end: “If I go to the swimming pool or take a shower in this water, will I become pink from head to toe and live as a pink person forever?”
Perhaps femininity is like transparent water. If I go in and come out of the water, shake the water off myself, only I remain. Neither the water nor femininity, are my identity.

Medium:

Screen print on paper

Size:

20X20cm

Boys don't cry

Gathered here are the bravest of the brave from history. They clearly show what exaggerated masculinity is. I have invited them and brought them together for therapy. Even though they are so brave and full of manliness, as humans they also need time to think about themselves and drop some small tears. But for our heroes, that is not easy. They need a different kind of courage to do so. During my therapy, they encountered the “primordial pink” in their lives, the tears they always thought were too weak and girly.

Medium:

Photo collage

Size:

75X100cm

Ordinary man

The true ordinary man knows how to cry. Do you think he is weak and girly? No? Then how about pink tears? Do you like it?

Medium:

Plaster and pigment

Size:

40X30X1cm

Une Vie

The French writer, Guy de Maupassant had a special perspective when he observed people during his historical time. He wrote a book in 1833, “Une Vie”, which translates into “A woman’s life” in English. In its story, he shows his sympathy for women at that time. Although the story is from 150 years ago, I don’t think the life featured in the book is a story of the past. In my project, women from Maupassant’s time and from nowadays become female dogs, or bitches, a word that is often used to disparage women. A dog’s life is very similar to a woman’s life in the sense that sometimes people don’t pay attention to them even when they express themselves loudly, like a dog barking and pooping in a public space. I am presenting the way society treats women, as well as its consequences, with simple and humorous drawings. Singularly they are not threatening, but when angry dogs group together, they amplify their own voices.

Medium:

Oil pastels on fabric

Size:

145X350cm

Front

First page

Full page

Full page

Last page

Front

The French writer, Guy de Maupassant had a special perspective when he observed people during his historical time. He wrote a book in 1833, “Une Vie”, which translates into “A woman’s life” in English. In its story, he shows his sympathy for women at that time. Although the story is from 150 years ago, I don’t think the life featured in the book is a story of the past. In my project, women from Maupassant’s time and from nowadays become female dogs, or bitches, a word that is often used to disparage women. A dog’s life is very similar to a woman’s life in the sense that sometimes people don’t pay attention to them even when they express themselves loudly, like a dog barking and pooping in a public space. I am presenting the way society treats women, as well as its consequences, with simple and humorous drawings. Singularly they are not threatening, but when angry dogs group together, they amplify their own voices.

All images and texts are printed with lithography.

Medium:

Lithography on calico

Size:

10X15X2cm
Launch Project

Louder

Bitch March

The French writer, Guy de Maupassant had a special perspective when he observed people during his historical time. He wrote a book in 1833, “Une Vie”, which translates into “A woman’s life” in English. In its story, he shows his sympathy for women at that time. Although the story is from 150 years ago, I don’t think the life featured in the book is a story of the past. In my project, women from Maupassant’s time and from nowadays become female dogs, or bitches, a word that is often used to disparage women. A dog’s life is very similar to a woman’s life in the sense that sometimes people don’t pay attention to them even when they express themselves loudly, like a dog barking and pooping in a public space. I am presenting the way society treats women, as well as its consequences, with simple and humorous drawings. Singularly they are not threatening, but when angry dogs group together, they amplify their own voices.

Medium:

Colour pencils, oil pastels and collage on paper

Size:

36X25cm
Social
Royal College of Art
Registered Office: Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, South Kensington, London SW7 2EU
RCA™ Royal College of Art™ are trademarks of the Royal College of Art