Visual Communication – Experimental Communication (MA)

George Dutton

Contact

georgeedwarddutton@gmail.com

Website

Instagram

Degree Details

School of Communication

Toolkit

Toolkit Set

Workshop during WIP

Workshop with Service Design

Collection of Drawn Twos Zeros

Collection of Vectorised Glyphs

RCA2020 is the visual identity and online platform design for the Royal College of Art’s final year show. A collaboration between George Dutton, Philip Veech and Sean Steed.

Our aim was to create an identity that is inclusive and collaborative, to capture a snapshot of the Royal College of Art in 2020, to represent the diversity, creativity and hybridity of it’s community.

We were able to utilise our unique position of being current students designing for our final year show, this allowed us to conduct student consultations and workshops, to help inform the final outcome. Initially we conducted a series of interviews across all three campuses to gain insight into various departments.


Through the interviews conducted, there was a consensus that the analogue process remains vital to many practices. As mark making is inherent to all creative processes, with all ideas initially coined through draftsmanship.

In order to create a cross-RCA identity, a series of short workshops were held throughout the College, where students drew and interpreted sets of ‘twos’ and ‘zeros’ within the framework of a modular toolkit stencil. Workshops were undertaken to inform the final outcome of the identity, generating an extensive archive of 2020s.

The toolkit contains a series of modular shaped stencils which created the framework for the students to work within. This allowed for a series of outcomes that carry a visual language and maintain consistency in identity whilst showcasing a variation and individuality across departments and students. The modularity of the identity allows for flexibility across platforms and mediums; initially intended for applications across campuses, but suitably applicable for digital scales.

Philip Veech:

Sean Steed:

Modular
Typography
Workshop
RCA2020 is the visual identity and online platform design for the Royal College of Art’s final year show. A collaboration between George Dutton, Philip Veech and Sean Steed.

Our aim was to create an identity that is inclusive and collaborative, to capture a snapshot of the Royal College of Art in 2020, to represent the diversity, creativity and hybridity of it’s community.

We were able to utilise our unique position of being current students designing for our final year show, this allowed us to conduct student consultations and workshops, to help inform the final outcome. Initially we conducted a series of interviews across all three campuses to gain insight into various departments.

Through the interviews conducted, there was a consensus that the analogue process remains vital to many practices. As mark making is inherent to all creative processes, with all ideas initially coined through draftsmanship.

In order to create a cross-RCA identity, a series of short workshops were held throughout the College, where students drew and interpreted sets of ‘twos’ and ‘zeros’ within the framework of a modular toolkit stencil. Workshops were undertaken to inform the final outcome of the identity, generating an extensive archive of 2020s.

The toolkit contains a series of modular shaped stencils which created the framework for the students to work within. This allowed for a series of outcomes that carry a visual language and maintain consistency in identity whilst showcasing a variation and individuality across departments and students. The modularity of the identity allows for flexibility across platforms and mediums; initially intended for applications across campuses, but suitably applicable for digital scales.

Philip Veech:

Battersea Campus Entrance

Kensington Campus Entrance

WIP Leaflets

WIP Leaflet Spread

WIP Glyphs in Outline

WIP Glyphs in Outline

White City Campus Entrance

WIP 2020 sought to reflect the work-in-progress spirit of the show, through showcasing the initial loose experiments of the 2020’s at the time. The glyphs were presented in black and white outlines to showcase the process, method and modularity behind glyph generation. WIP 2020 also acted as a soft release of the final visual identity.

Philip Veech:

Sean Steed:

College Wide RCA2020 Motion

College Wide RCA2020 Motion

RCA2020 Glyphset

RCA2020 Glyphsets in Motion

RCA2020 Glyphsets in Motion

School Specific Motion School of Communication and Arts Humanities

School Specific Motion School of Communication and Arts Humanities

School Specific Motion School of Architecture and Design

School Specific Motion School of Architecture and Design

RCA2020 Type Families

WIP 2020 and beyond was the opportunity to kickstart the workshops throughout the College. Workshops had begun before the pandemic, but were abruptly halted by lockdown. This also led to the movement from a physical to a digital show.

However, from the workshops we managed to hold, we analysed and highlighted interesting aspects of the students’ interpretations. From there we extrapolated and expanded on certain typographic elements to create four distinct type families to be used for RCA2020. Each representing a School within the Royal College of Art.

The modularity of the identity ensured that it could be responsive to various digital applications and screen ratios, it also allowed us to bring motion into the design, to reflect upon the online platform’s ‘liveness’. The motion helped further define and distinguish between the four type families, as each set adopted a unique motion.

The platform itself maintains aspects of the modularity initially used for the visual identity. We ensured that the students’ work is the main focus of the platform, ensuring that the design isn’t overbearing. We are merely designing the platform framework, the student work and voice is the heart of the online platform.

Although RCA2020 is no longer a physical show, we believe that this year’s digital platform is an opportunity to share work with a broader audience while being reflective of the times we are in. The platform will accommodate both linear and non-linear modes of viewing where visitors are prompted to search, explore and engage with the graduates’ works. Its emphasis of “liveness” will manifest itself through streamed events, curated collections, stories, tagging system and motion.

Philip Veech:

Sean Steed:

Concrete Gold Cover

Concrete Gold - Page 22

Concrete Gold Page 32

Concrete Gold Page 62

Concrete Gold Page 76

Concrete Gold Page 82

A research investigation into the state of the United Kingdom’s council housing. This publication focuses in on the architectural shortcomings, through the example of Robin Hood Gardens and the representation within the media, through political rhetoric and use of estates in TV/film.

Housing has become a national obsession; it is the one socio-political issue that concerns all ages in all walks of life. It defines our place in the world and society. Ultimately when we discuss our housing and wealth “what we are talking about is our freedom." We become less free for fear of the insecurity, of arbitrary evictions, of our worth, of the stigma, of our future. This affects everyone; just the degree of its impact or importance is relative, with the “sparse mosaic of lights illuminating London’s new high-rises" revealing the true narrative, housing has become one of the most important commodities in Britain, “a fundamental need for all has become a goldmine for a few.”

Medium:

Pillar Bind, Digital Print

Size:

132mm x 178mm
A research investigation into the state of the United Kingdom’s council housing. This publication focuses in on the architectural shortcomings, through the example of Robin Hood Gardens and the representation within the media, through political rhetoric and use of estates in TV/film.

Housing has become a national obsession; it is the one socio-political issue that concerns all ages in all walks of life. It defines our place in the world and society. Ultimately when we discuss our housing and wealth “what we are talking about is our freedom." We become less free for fear of the insecurity, of arbitrary evictions, of our worth, of the stigma, of our future. This affects everyone; just the degree of its impact or importance is relative, with the “sparse mosaic of lights illuminating London’s new high-rises" revealing the true narrative, housing has become one of the most important commodities in Britain, “a fundamental need for all has become a goldmine for a few.”

Medium:

Pillar Bind, Digital Print

Size:

132mm x 178mm
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